Spanish style home decor


Spanish culture has influenced architecture and home design across South of Europe, Southeastern United States and, obviously South America.

Exposed wooden ceiling beams, stucco-like wall paint, dark wood features with iron elements, patios and colorful tiles are some of the most prominent characteristics of a Spanish-style interior design.

However, whether you’re living in Madrid, Barcelona or anywhere in the world, it’s quite easy to add a touch of Spain to your home décor.

Let’s analyze some of the main characteristics.




Fireplaces are both functional and decorative elements and this style often features them with decorative mantels and frames. Ornate patterns and lines are used to make the fireplace stand out and sometimes contrast with the rest of the room.


Catalan ceiling


The Catalan vault, is a type of low arch made of plain bricks often used to make a structural floor surface. It is built by laying bricks lengthwise over a wood form or “centering”, making it a gentler curve than has generally been produced by other methods of construction.

Of Roman origin, it is a traditional form in Catalonia (where it is widely used), and has spread around the Mediterranean area and the world through the work of Catalan architects such as Antoni Gaudí and Josep Puig i Cadafalch.


patio-1192247_1920In Spanish-style homes, the patio is usually a covered space that traditionally serves to protect from the heat during the ‘siesta’ hours.

In particular, the Andalusian patio, typical of the Southern region of Andalucia, is a stone patio typically decorated with flowers and plants. It is an architectural fusion of the Roman and Andalusian world.




Colorful tiles


Spanish homes are often decorated with tiles that usually cover just the bottom half of the walls and there’s a clear line that separates the surfaces.

The tiles are very colorful, especially in the South, most frequently displaying earthy tones and shades of brown, red and blue sometimes combined and used to create strong contrasting effects.




Wooden window shutter

StockSnap_JBA0TU6048The so-called ‘persiana’ is made of wood and is usually painted in green or brown.

It helps to keep the heat away and to keep quiet during the traditional ‘siesta’, the after-lunch pause that lasts between 2 and 4 hours..


Which Spanish-style element would you choose for your home?


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